Tag Archives: indie publishing

The Advice I Got From a Hollywood Producer

writing

A while back, I had the honor of asking for and receiving advice from Joel Eisenberg, a Hollywood producer whose books are now becoming a television series (The Chronicles of Ara).

This information just doesn’t get old!

So here are the questions I asked him, after reading a post about his journey as a writer.

My Questions

Hi Joel,

Would you call your story of becoming a writer…relatable? How much of your path relied on luck, being in the right spot at the time, etc.? I hear stories like yours a decent amount, and I always find myself sighing: How could that ever happen to me?

From what you said, I understand that you literally gave up everything to become a writer. Maybe it didn’t seem like you were giving anything up, but from my perspective, it certainly seems like it. You ditched reason and what others would call having a “normal life” (by ditching your job!). I understand that this worked for you in the long run…but would you encourage others to do the same thing, even though this could potentially distort someone’s life…and then, in the end, it may not even pan out the way it did for you?

Just coming to you honestly, thanks for any advice!

-Dominic

His Reply

Love the questions, Dominic. Thank you and I appreciate your honest feedback more than you know. Let me try to take these in order.

“Would you call your story of becoming a writer … relatable?”

– My path was my path; some may relate, others may not. Remember, Dominic, as I mentioned in a prior reply above – everyone’s path is individual. Some may have commitments with their children, for example, while others may have no children. Some may work 15 hour days to pay bills and work jobs they loathe, while others may have certain freedoms based on the amount of money in a savings account. Your path will never exactly follow another.

However, like John Grisham, who worked countless hours as an attorney and wrote “The Firm” in whatever spare moments he had, like Stephen King and so many others … A person can ALWAYS find the time to write, or send an email query, or replay to a blog post. It becomes then a question of time management and discipline to most prudently work with the tools you have to attain your goals.

“How much of your path relied on luck, being in the right spot at the time, etc.?”

– That was actually my problem for so long. I waited and waited and waited some more … and nothing happened. There were projects here and there, stacks of returned scripts … but my career went nowhere. It’s only when I got desperate that I realized only I could turn all this around. I did something I never did – I wrote that book (and did have a few non-performing films prior) – and it made all the difference for me. I PROACTIVELY kept in touch with all the people who contributed that trod similar paths, and I PROACTIVELY kept up my networking group for years. I got out of my comfort zone. I don’t believe “luck” was part of the equation.

“I hear stories like yours a decent amount, and I always find myself sighing: How could that ever happen to me?”

– I made that same observation and asked myself that exact question for so many years. I’ve so been there. But see above. I never stopped writing. I never stopped dreaming. The sacrifices were outrageous and I would not recommend those sacrifices to everyone. But, again, I’ve always had a sort of primal “need” to write; it’s always been more than a simple “want” for me. I made it work. The others who share similar stories made it work as well.

Look, sacrifice is a monster. I ended relationships, risked sleeping on the street, and a relatively new marriage, didn’t eat well, paid bills late … I would not recommend this. But my point is — I found the way. I tell people who attend my courses, speaking engagements and such that they don’t have to go to the extent I have. I did all the work. I learned what works and what does not, and why. There is no road map; if there was everyone would follow it and everyone would share the same degree of success.

There’s not a roadmap, though, but what there is are very specific strategies to save you an insane amount of work to help you get where you need to be.

Not luck, science.

Hope the response helps …


I was so happy that he took me seriously and actually got back to me!  I also respected that he didn’t sugar-coat anything; he was being totally honest.  Overall, I think what he said was encouraging, but you still get the sense that being a writer is HARD.

What do you think of his response?  Thoughts?


So I published a book!!!  Here’s the description:

elithius-cover-official

His parents abandon him when he’s thirteen. He’s left to care for his little brother and sister. Life is tough. Things can’t seem to get any worse.

But then Evil Itself breaks down the door. It kidnaps his siblings. And It leaves him bleeding out on the floor of his own home.

The Golden Lands, one of the Three Worlds of Elithius, is supposed to be a place of light, peace and happiness. But the Golden Lands hasn’t been such a place for John Hedekira, a jaded, hot-headed sixteen-year-old. Joined by his friends Faith Pinck and Bernard Tanner, John must rescue his brother and sister from their captors…before his siblings can be sacrificed to the ominous God of Death.

Do check it out here if you’re interested!!!

 

Longer or Shorter Books? Which Do You Prefer?

books
the image is not mine

This is actually a serious question.  I think there are different types of readers out there.  There are some who prefer quicker, shorter novels that they can read in a day or two.  And then there are other readers who like novels that are longer, that they can snuggle up with for a week or two, and read at a leisurely pace.

Make note, this post has nothing to do with how readers PACE themselves.  I genuinely want to know which kind of book you prefer: long or short.

I think we can agree that some books are TOO long…those exceeding 800 pages tend to push it for me.  If the book is part of a series, all right, maybe it’s not such a big deal (in the case of Inheritance by Christopher Paolini).  But no one likes picking up a standalone that’s 800 pages long.   If the story is 800 pages long, why not split it up into three smaller books?  Big books can be daunting.

The benefits of longer books, especially if they are a part of a series, is that those books seem to go way deeper into character development, plot development, cultural issues and formation, descriptive writing, etc.  Shorter, fast-paced books seem to avoid these; they are page turners, instead.  Don’t get me wrong, there can still be lots of descriptive writing (like in The Lord of the Flies).  But shorter novels tend to focus more on actions, without taking the time to describe the setting.

froggy

I’m currently wondering about how I should form my own book series, Elithius.  Before, when my series was called “The Golden Lands”, I had planned about 18 volumes of novella-sized stories.  No volume was going to exceed 200 pages.

But now, I’m considering compiling several of the books together.  For instance, the first four volumes of the story will now become Book One of Elithius.  

What do you think of this?  Do you prefer longer or shorter books?

Do you think it’s better to keep the volumes separate, and have a lot of books, or to make them more novel-sized (about 320 pages each), and have just a few books?

Your input really matters!!!

The Advice I Got From a Hollywood Producer

writing

I had the honor of receiving a reply from Joel Eisenberg, a Hollywood producer whose books are now becoming a television series (The Chronicles of Ara).

So here are the questions I asked him, after reading a post about his journey as a writer.

My Questions

Hi Joel,

Would you call your story of becoming a writer…relatable? How much of your path relied on luck, being in the right spot at the time, etc.? I hear stories like yours a decent amount, and I always find myself sighing: How could that ever happen to me?

From what you said, I understand that you literally gave up everything to become a writer. Maybe it didn’t seem like you were giving anything up, but from my perspective, it certainly seems like it. You ditched reason and what others would call having a “normal life” (by ditching your job!). I understand that this worked for you in the long run…but would you encourage others to do the same thing, even though this could potentially distort someone’s life…and then, in the end, it may not even pan out the way it did for you?
Just coming to you honestly, thanks for any advice!
-Dominic

His Reply

Love the questions, Dominic. Thank you and I appreciate your honest feedback more than you know. Let me try to take these in order.

“Would you call your story of becoming a writer … relatable?”

– My path was my path; some may relate, others may not. Remember, Dominic, as I mentioned in a prior reply above – everyone’s path is individual. Some may have commitments with their children, for example, while others may have no children. Some may work 15 hour days to pay bills and work jobs they loathe, while others may have certain freedoms based on the amount of money in a savings account. Your path will never exactly follow another.

However, like John Grisham, who worked countless hours as an attorney and wrote “The Firm” in whatever spare moments he had, like Stephen King and so many others … A person can ALWAYS find the time to write, or send an email query, or replay to a blog post. It becomes then a question of time management and discipline to most prudently work with the tools you have to attain your goals.

“How much of your path relied on luck, being in the right spot at the time, etc.?”

– That was actually my problem for so long. I waited and waited and waited some more … and nothing happened. There were projects here and there, stacks of returned scripts … but my career went nowhere. It’s only when I got desperate that I realized only I could turn all this around. I did something I never did – I wrote that book (and did have a few non-performing films prior) – and it made all the difference for me. I PROACTIVELY kept in touch with all the people who contributed that trod similar paths, and I PROACTIVELY kept up my networking group for years. I got out of my comfort zone. I don’t believe “luck” was part of the equation.

“I hear stories like yours a decent amount, and I always find myself sighing: How could that ever happen to me?”

– I made that same observation and asked myself that exact question for so many years. I’ve so been there. But see above. I never stopped writing. I never stopped dreaming. The sacrifices were outrageous and I would not recommend those sacrifices to everyone. But, again, I’ve always had a sort of primal “need” to write; it’s always been more than a simple “want” for me. I made it work. The others who share similar stories made it work as well.

Look, sacrifice is a monster. I ended relationships, risked sleeping on the street, and a relatively new marriage, didn’t eat well, paid bills late … I would not recommend this. But my point is — I found the way. I tell people who attend my courses, speaking engagements and such that they don’t have to go to the extent I have. I did all the work. I learned what works and what does not, and why. There is no road map; if there was everyone would follow it and everyone would share the same degree of success.

There’s not a roadmap, though, but what there is are very specific strategies to save you an insane amount of work to help you get where you need to be.

Not luck, science.

Hope the response helps …


I was so happy that he took me seriously and actually got back to me!  I also respected that he didn’t sugar-coat anything; he was being totally honest.  Overall, I think what he said was encouraging, but you still get the sense that being a writer is HARD.

What do you think of his response?  Thoughts?


So I published a book!!!  Here’s the description:

elithius-cover-official
Cover art by Elizabeth M

His parents abandon him when he’s thirteen. He’s left to care for his little brother and sister. Life is tough. Things can’t seem to get any worse.

But then Evil Itself breaks down the door. It kidnaps his siblings. And It leaves him bleeding out on the floor of his own home.

The Golden Lands, one of the Three Worlds of Elithius, is supposed to be a place of light, peace and happiness. But the Golden Lands hasn’t been such a place for John Hedekira, a jaded, hot-headed sixteen-year-old. Joined by his friends Faith Pinck and Bernard Tanner, John must rescue his brother and sister from their captors…before his siblings can be sacrificed to the ominous God of Death.

Do check it out here if you’re interested!!!